Traininng.com live webinar, December 1 – Professional Presence: The Essentials of Credibility, Composure and Confidence

Presence is personality projected. A presence that speaks well of an individual is one that projects credibility, composure, and confidence. These behaviors are not spoken but rather are displayed through the sum total of the individual. This persona is built on a healthy foundation of positive self esteem and rational thinking. Attending meetings, delivering presentations, conversing with colleagues: all these work events provide an opportunity to promote presence. Our appearance, non-verbal communication, voice and words all combine to demonstrate our persona and as such much be constructed in a way that consistently sends the right message.

Click here to visit traininng.com and attend this webinar!

Learn how to keep your composure and self-confidence high in the midst of hardship; how to identify and overcome your self-imposed barriers and limits. Learn to create win-win solutions with everyone you work with. In this exciting talk, you’ll learn how to confidently express your ideas and feelings; deal with negative, aggressive and difficult people; never feel the need to make excuses, over-explain, or over-apologize. You’ll learn how to speak about your accomplishments with accuracy and confidence.

Participants will…
• Maximize our impressions management skills
• Appreciate the role of appearance in building credibility
• Explore the role of non verbal communication in enhancing composure and confidence
• Understand self-concept and its influence on our work
• Recognize the importance of emotions in the workplace
• Be politically savvy through assertive communication
• Deal rationally and effectively with difficult people.
• Prevent communication breakdowns
• Identify and dispute the fallacies that create debilitative emotions
• Incorporate rational thinking to maintain emotional control
• Create and maintain a communication climate of support rather than defensiveness
• Maintain control in difficult to control situations
• Manage expectations throughout the process to circumvent excessive demands
• Use professional integrity as a tool to disarm difficult interactions
• Communicate assertive statements to clarify expectations clearly
• Explore win-win outcomes to deal with unreasonable requests

Parliament Hill Fashion

A what-to-wear tutorial for those looking to land on the Hill
Elizabeth Gray-Smith (ipolitics.ca)

MPs live and breathe in the public eye. Standing in the house, scrumming in the halls, posing at podiums, swooshing through galas, flipping pancakes and picking up babies – there is no hiding from the camera. So, given the many public adventures (and potential misadventures) facing MPs in a given day, how important is their fashion finess and mastery of style?

“Let’s get right to it… their image matters,” says Lynne Mackay, an image consultant with 30 years of experience coaching people – some senior politicians – on how to look, behave and communicate. Mackay advised Conservative candidates in the ’93 and ’97 federal elections.

“Persona and sincerity – all of it matters on camera – as does how you look,” says Mackay. “People are absorbed by that, especially in North America… we are a very visual society.”

With an election in sight, it begs the question: what should candidates think about as they prepare to dress the role of an MP at the top of their game on the Hill?

 

According to Mackay, becoming the savvy sartorialist is the first step. “Trends come and go but what really matters is how a garment fits – that is key at this level. If you are rushed on scrums, appearing up close on camera, and your clothing is ill-fitting it is a complete distraction to the viewer.”

Keeping a finger on the pulse of fashion while staying current with the headlines can’t hurt. “Don’t date yourself,” says Mackay. “If you are wearing suits that are five, six or seven years old, chancer are your outfit is dated.”

In an arena where the choice of hues can corner you in the ring – with four popular colours taken by party brands – what is left to pick from on the palettes?

Many MPs have made their party brand their own insignia. Olivia Chow was known for her orange gowns, Carolyn Bennett’s closet is filled with red accessories and Elizabeth May has more than a few green items.

Mackay identifies plum, wine, orchid, violet and eggplant as safe, non-partisan colour choices. No matter how clever the colour choice is, the outfit as a whole has to translate well on screen. “It all has to look good on camera,” says Mackay.

Under the rays of fluorescent lighting, she wars, black suits can often look green. Plus, solid black is linked to weddings and funerals and can look overwhelming on certain individuals. Mackay recommends taking a departure from the solid navy or charcoal grey norma and going the route of slate greys or ink blues and introducing a stripe or subtle check in bordeaux or oxblood.

“Blue-greens and teals are also interesting in ties and work well on camera,” says Mackay. In summer, she urges MPs to favour seasonal elements like taupe or beige in lght weight wools or cotton. She is also a fan of the seersucker sport jacked which can instantly add variety to conventional suit picks.

The big take-away from the experts: no matter what, be true to yourself. Be genuine. Know  your body. Know the day ahead of you. And be prepared for that camera in your face.